ITHACA FARMERS MARKET: ENJOY A PICNIC

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ITHACA FARMERS MARKET
 
OPEN SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS
 
 
The Ithaca Farmers Market is definitely the “happening place” on Saturday mornings. You can still buy wintered over vegetables like parsnips and leeks but the fresh veggies are also springing up . Asparagus and spinach and lettuce greens are abundant now, as are every kind of flower and herb
 
 
 
Some new and many of the old favorite prepared food vendors are making the choices even more difficult. One great way to maximize the enjoyment is to have a picnic.  With a wonderful selection of wine, bread, cheese and cold cuts , you can have yourself a feast.  THE PIGGERY, which was a sometime vendor last year now have their own stall at the North end of the long arm. They are the only meat purveyor that sells fresh meat. The various cuts of pork are displayed much as you would see it in a European charcuterie. Charcuterie is the French word for both a pork butcher and the products of his labor. A charcutier takes pork and makes sausages, hams, confit, pates, terrines, etc, all of which comprise charcuterie. Charcuterie is the prototypical convenience food. A jar of pate and a baguette is lunch.
 
For this husband and wife team, Peggy Sanford and Brad Marshall, the Piggery is a labor of love. Brad says his work is the charcuterie business and in his hobby is taking care of his pigs. In other words he works all the time. 
 
Often they have little samples and I’ve tried several. The smoked sausage ("smoked grillers") are really wonderful as is the liver pate and the sliced ham. I’m hoping to see some more pates varieties made with nuts, prunes and liquors and with a little more assertive spicing.
 
The Piggery takes good care of their pigs. These are pasture raised heritage breeds who also get fed locally grown organic grain. Peggy and Brad are committed to sustainability and prepare their products in a specially designed off grid kitchen. 
 
SO….to take the European feasting one step further….buy some charcuterie from the Piggery, some cheese from one of the other vendors and a crispy baguette, and a bottle of wine and what more could you want?
 
 
 
 
 
FAT BOYis one of my favorites among several top notch European style bakers. Their plain and semolina baguettes are what you’d expect to find in Paris. They sell out of these treasures quickly. They also have many other varieties of bread including epi, pain rustique, mixed grain, rye  whole barley, sourdough, wheat walnut and Bavarian farm bread.   All are beautiful to behold and worthy to serve at the finest meal. Their pastries, cookies and scones are hard to pass up so my advise is to make your way through a sample of every delicacy they prepare.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
And to round out your picnic, stop by NORTHLAND SHEEP DAIRY where Maryrose  Livingston makes European quality cheese. She and her partner Donn Hewes are a team; he working the farm with his team of draft horses and mules and she holding the job of  shepherd and cheesemaker. They sell several cheese varieties and always have samples to taste. I like them all and am very excited to try the Torta de la Serena which Maryrose will begin making soon. Maryrose spent part of her winter interning in Western Spain in the region called Extramadura with one of the few cheese makers left making this cheese with his own herd of grass fed sheep. If all goes well we should be sampling a young cheese in August. This is my all time favorite Spanish cheese.
 
The Ithaca Farmers Market is open Saturdays 9-3 and Sundays 10-3 
 
Check out last year’s post for some of other great food vendor tips:  ITHACA FARMERS MARKET POST MAY 08

 

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MADELINE’S COCONUT CHILI SHRIMP

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SHRIMP IN ROASTED CHILI-COCONUT SAUCE
(Adapted from Madeline’s version)
Serves 4
 
14oz. can unsweetened coconut milk (low fat or regular)
 2 Tbs. Thai roasted red chili paste (Wegman’s international: Asian section)
1 Tbs. grated fresh ginger
1 Tbs. finely chopped garlic
3 Kaffir lime leaves
5 large shallots: peeled and chopped (about ¼ pound)
2 Tbs. chopped Thai basil (optional)
1 tsp. sugar
1 to 1 ½  lbs. shrimp de-veined and shelled.
 
 
  1. Combine the chili paste, garlic and ginger in a frying pan with a little oil and fry, stirring until fragrant. 
  2. Add to crock-pot or regular pot with the coconut milk. If using a crock-pot you can put it on “high” and walk away for 2 hours while it cooks. If using a regular pot, then simmer, covered, gently for 40 minutes, checking and stirring regularly.
  3. Meanwhile fry the shallots in a little oil over med-high heat, stirring, until brown. Set aside.
  4. When the chili mixture is cooked, add shallots and remove from heat.
  5. When cool enough, refrigerate the chili mixture overnight.
  6. Before serving reheat the chili mixture, remove the kaffir lime leaves, and blend in blender until a little smoother but not too creamy.
  7. Bring back to a simmer and check for seasoning. I add a teaspoon of sugar at this point. If it needs to be a little thicker simmer without a lid for a few minutes until the desired consistency is achieved.
  8. Add shrimp and, depending on the size, simmer gently for 3-5 minutes until the shrimp are pink and cooked through.
  9. Add the Thai basil and serve with Jasmine rice.
 
Notes:
  •  Thai red chili paste (Thai Kitchen brand) comes in a 4 oz. Jar. 2 Tbs. is almost half the jar. It makes for a medium spicy dish so you may want more or less according to your taste.
  •    Kaffir limes are hard to get right now. They usually come in a package with more than you need. Wegmans and the Asian markets carry them when they’re in season. I freeze what I don’t need. If you can’t find them, the dish will still be delicious.

 

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MARINATED VEGETABLE SALAD

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 MARINATED VEGETABLE SALAD (Anita Devine)
 
1 head romaine lettuce, finely chopped
¼ head red cabbage, finely sliced
1 block marinate tofu (I use tofu kan), chopped
1 cup dry roasted organic peanuts, skin on
1 small jar marinated artichokes, chopped
1 carrot, shredded
½ cup sprouts ( I used mix sprouts)
 
Dressing
½ tsp toasted sesame oil
1 Tbs. ume vinegar
1 Tbs shoyu (or regular soy sauce)
Juice of one orange
1 Tbs. rice syrup
1 ½ Tbs. mustard (I use whole grain Dijon)
 
  1. Mix together dressing ingredients and set aside.
  2. Place sliced red cabbage in a bowl, mix with ¼ tsp sea salt, place a place over it and weigh it down for one hour to extract some of the liquid. (I skip this step)
  3. Mix together all the vegetables, tofu, and peanuts and toss with dressing.
 
 

 

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QUINOA SALAD

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I’ve been finding some very unique and wonderful salad recipes. I was fortunate to get  this recipes from Anita Devine who teaches macrobiotic cooking at GreenStar Cooperative Market. This slightly adapted salad has become an  instant favorite of our family.  This is a great introduction dish for people new to quinoa.  I haven’t yet met someone who didn’t like it.  An extra benefit is that quinoa is a  very healthy "super grain" with high protein.
 
 
QUINOA WITH PECANS AND CRANBERRIES
 
1 cup quinoa, rinsed
2 cups water
1/2  cup pecans (or I’ve had good luck substituting walnuts) coarsely chopped
3 scallions, cut into thin rounds
1/3 cup parsley, finely chopped
1/3 cup dried cranberries
OR 1 cup corn, frozen or canned (I use both!!!)
 
Dressing:
1 tsp sesame oil
1/4 cup  lemon juice
1  tsp ume vinager 
2 Tbs rice vinegar
Dash of black pepper
 
1. Rinse quinoa and put it in  pot with water (2 parts water to 1 part quinoa) and bring to a boil.  Simmer until water has been absorbed.  Set aside.
 2. Lightly toast nuts and set aside
 3. Combine salad dressing ingredients
 4. When quinoa is cool to warm add dressing and scallions, parsley, cranberries, nuts and corn and mix together. Taste for seasoning.
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TURKISH RED LENTIL AND BULGUR SOUP FROM DANO’S

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 Karen Gilman,  of  Dano’s Heuriger on Seneca was kind enough to send me this recipe from the wonderful Turkish meal they served the other day.  This soup is incredible.  Trust me.  It is truly unique and these complex combination of flavors and textures really work.  Yes, the dried mint is just right.  The only thing I changed was that I used chicken broth instead of water or vegetable broth and I added about 1 Tbs. of pomegranate molasses.  This added just a subtle tang that I needed to make it perfect.  Both the pomegranate molasses and the red pepper paste (I used Marco Polo brand red pepper spread with eggplant and garlic) can be found in the international foods section at Wegmans.  And "yes" it’s worth it to get these products and make this soup. Thank you Karen and Dano!

Red Lentil, Bulgur and Mint Soup

serves 4-6

 
2 tbl virgin olive oil
a large spanish onion finely diced
2 clove garlic minced
2 tbl red pepper paste turkish
1 cup tomato juice
2 tbl paprika
1/2 tsp Turkish red pepper or ground red pepper
6 cups vegetable broth or water
1 1/2 cup red lentils
1/4 cup fine bulgur
1 tbl dried mint salt and pepper
 
topping
 4 tbl unsalted butter
1 tsp dried mint
1/2 tsp paprika
 
 
  • Heat olive oil; add onion and garlic cook gently over medium heat until soft not brown.
  • Stir in pepper paste, tomato juice, paprika and Turkish pepper. Add lentils and broth.
  • Cover pot bring to boil lower heat cook 30 minutes stir occasionally until lentils blend with broth. 
  • Add bulgur and mint season with salt and pepper. Cook for 10 minutes stir occasionally, if soup is too thick add more broth.
 
To make topping, melt butter over low heat,  add the mint and paprika and stir until mixture sizzles.
Ladle soup in bowl and drizzle topping on top to taste.
 

 

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ANOTHER WONDERFUL AND EASY WINTER SOUP

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CREAMY BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP WITH STAR ANISE
(inspired by Suzanne Fine Regional Cuisine)
 
 
I have been making this soup for years but with Suzanne’s inspiration I have added star anise to my recipe and it makes for a perfect marriage of flavor. This is one of the easiest recipes and one that everyone loves. It’s my favorite way to use butternut squash.
 
 
1 medium sized butternut squash peeled, seeded and cut into large chunks (2-3 inches)
2 TBS butter
32 ounces chicken or vegetable broth
2 star anise pods
Salt and pepper
1 TBS brown sugar (to taste if necessary)
¼ cup milk or cream or ½ & ½  (optional)
 
 
  1. Fry the squash over high heat stirring frequently until the squash is slightly browned and very aromatic.
  2. Add salt and a lot of black pepper (to your taste) and fry a minute longer.
  3. Add broth and star anise and simmer for 20-30 minutes until squash is soft.
  4. Let cool, remove star anise, and puree in blender until very smooth.
  5. Adjust for seasoning and add sugar if needed.  Squash vary in their sweetness.
  6. Refrigerate a day or more for best flavor.
  7. Reheat and if you'd like,  add milk or cream before serving. I don't do think it needs milk or cream.

 
 
 
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GREAT WINTER SOUP

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ROOT VEGETABLE SOUP
 
I have been making this soup for years. And everyone loves this soup.You don’t need to worry too much about exact quantities here. Just use the root vegetables you have around. Full Plate CSA has been supplying us with great amounts of parsnips, turnips, rutabagas and carrots. I also love celeriac in this soup, and butternut squash. 
 
2 Tbs. butter
1-2 Tbs. olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
½ pound of at least three of the following: parsnips, carrots, rutabaga, butternut and celeriac, or turnips peeled and cut into about a ¾   inch dice.
32 ounces of either chicken or vegetable
1 bay leaf
Salt and pepper to taste
¼ cup water
1-2 Tbs. corn starch
½ cup milk or ½ and ½ or cream
Salt and pepper to taste
1 cup frozen green peas
 
  1. Fry onions in 1 tbs. melted butter in large saucepan until soft and just beginning to brown, remove and set aside.
  2. Add the rest of the butter and some olive oil and fry the vegetables one vegetable at a time over very high heat until fragrant and beginning to brown. 
  3. Combine  all the vegetables including the onions, add a bay leaf and salt and pepper to taste, and the broth and simmer, covered for 20-30 minutes or until the vegetables are soft, but not mushy.
  4. Just before the vegetables are cooked mix the cornstarch and water together and add 1 tablespoon at a time, stirring to the soup. Let it cook together and add only as much cornstarch as necessary to make a chowder consistency, stirring to avoid lumps. Simmer gently until the cornstarch taste is gone.
  5. Remove from heat and for best results refrigerate at least a day.
  6. Reheat, and when simmering add frozen peas. 
  7. When the peas are cooked, add the milk and remove the bay leaf.
  8. Taste for seasoning. This soup is good with lots of pepper.
 

 

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FEASTING on SENECA LAKE

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DANO’S AND SUZANNE FINE REGIONAL CUISINE
 
December was a good month for fine dining on Seneca Lake. Two of my favorite chefs put on great feasts. On December 6th Dano hosted a Turkish Night with his friend Oya Reiger working along side. She is a very talented Turkish cook and put on an elaborate spread of authentic dishes. Many of the ingredients needed to be special ordered and so there is little hope of every recreating this feast. Some of the highlights were a carrot dip made with cooked carrots, mint and yogurt that was unique and delicious. That was served at the table with homemade Dolma (stuffed grape leaves) and olives. Following was a creamy red lentil soup cooked with a special bulgur and mint butter. The only complaint was that it came in a tiny tea cup. It was perfectly spiced and flavorful.
 
The main buffet had an assortment of salads, a lamb stew and a chicken prepared in a walnut sauce. Everyone had favorites but I particularly liked the butternut squash borek with black sesame: a stuffed fried pastry which was creamy, sweet, salty and crispy all at once. Dessert was also buffet style, fortunately since it would have been impossible to decide. This way I could try everything and all were amazing and totally new taste experiences. My favorite was a semolina cake with orange and  lemon. The cake had been soaked in the citrus juice which resulted in a moist cake bursting with  flavor. I’m sure very few people have enjoyed a strudel of carrot, quince, chickpea and pine nut with orange honey. Not easy to describe but delicious nonetheless.
 
Dano and Karen really know how to throw a party. Their food is always delicious: creative and expertly prepared often with local seasonal ingredients. The original Turkish music was performed by Atakan Sari and friends and contributed nicely to the festive cultural experience. Keep checking their website and you’ll find that Dans’s Heuriger on Seneca offers several special dining events a year. 
 
Suzanne from Suzanne Fine Regional Cuisine also puts on quite a show at her yearly Winemaker Dinner. Last years’ was so good that I made sure to sign up early for her December 12th Dinner this year with guest winemaker Steve Shaw from Shaw Vineyard. Shaw’s is a relatively newcomer on the winery scene but he is certainly among the top winemakers and one to keep a close eye on. 
 
Suzanne offered some nice appetizers as we waited to be seated. The Old Townsend home was built in 1903 and has been lovingly restored into this elegant, warm and cozy restaurant with panoramic views of Seneca Lake. I was particularly enamored of the tiny crab cakes, some of the best I’ve every eaten. I asked Suzanne how they were made and she divulged the secret was a mousse of heavy cream, shrimp and a touch of gin is the binder that holds the crab together. No peppers or breadcrumbs to dilute the crab flavor. Once seated we were first served a creamy butternut squash soup that was poured into your soup bowl that had been adorned with ginger shrimp. The soup was outstanding and I will be posting a close version of the soup that I made at home a few days later. A 2005 Reisling was served with this course and though it was not a “dry” it actually was as dry as most of the dry Rieslings one finds in the Finger Lakes: a very good pairing and an excellent wine
     The next courses: a porcini dusted diver scallop with an herb potato crisp and cauliflower puree with a red wine butter sauce was a beautifully composed work of art, each element perfectly cooked. Scallops do not get better than this. Suzanne found extraordinary Baja diver scallops from California for this dish. The 2002 Chardonnay again was a very nice pairing.
 
The Pinot Noir (2002) was a wonderful surprise. It had body and complexity not usually found in Finger Lakes reds. It paired beautifully with the grilled quail with fig risotto, another elegantly prepared dish with a wonderful rich flavor. For dessert we had a warm chocolate cake with Belgian Chocolate Sauce and Vanilla bean ice cream. Suzanne’s desserts are all spectacular to see and to taste. This did not disappoint. 
 
I would strongly recommend keeping your eyes open for these special chef dinners. It provides an opportunity for chefs to showcase their talents and it makes for a special  evening of feasting.
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OUR COMMUNITY IN NEED

 

 

 

Friendship Donations Network (FDN)
 
 
FDN’s mission is to bridge the gap between surplus food (which would otherwise be  dumped) and hunger, malnutrition and food insecurity through efficient recovery and redistribution of nutritious food to our needy neighbors.  There is no eligibility requirement for those wanting food. 
 
One out of four people in Tompkins County- 27% is affected by food insecurity/hunger. FDN serves 2,500 persons weekly through 25 programs which include food pantries, community hot meals, outreach food deliveries to rural poor; low-wage work sites, non-profits and youth programs. There is food offered somewhere in Tompkins County seven days a week. For locations and hours you can visit the FDN website.
 
The annual estimated amount of FDN food donations is $1.5 to $2million for 600,000 to 800,000 pounds of mostly fresh perishable, nutritious food! 100% of donations fund direct services.  FDN has 200 volunteers and is 99% volunteer run.  
 
FDN has recently needed to hire a part time coordinator at an annual cost of $14,580. This person’s salary is the only overhead cost for running this program. For the last 20 years Sara Pines, the founder of the program has donated her time to serve as coordinator.  She now needs to find a successor.
 
THERE IS NOT ENOUGH FUNDING TO PAY THE COORDINATOR AND UNLESS FUNDS ARE RAISED THROUGH DONATIONS FDN WILL BE REQUIRED TO CLOSE IT”S DOORS.
 
FDN needs donations to pay for the coordinator’s salary. If you can help, please vist their website for more information
 
 

LOCAL MEAT

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LOCAL MEAT and TWO GREAT RECIPES
 
 
We are blessed with many area farmers who supply us with pasture raised natural meat. Most do not use chemicals or hormones but stop short of “organic” certification since this is such an arduous and expensive process. The farmers market (now open only on Saturdays until December 10th) is a good place to find several local meat sellers but there are other options around.
 
For GOAT meat we have John Wertis’ farm:  BWW.   Doug Gruen, chef of the Blue Stone Bar and Grill has been featuring John’s goat meat in his Indonesian Style Curry which was strongly recommended by Peggy Haine in the Ithaca Times Winter Guide 2008. Call ahead at the Blue Stone Bar to see whether it’s being served as a special that evening.
 
We also have locally grown BISON from Glenwood Farms which can be purchased now at the Saturday Farmer’s Market or at their farm at 1084 Glenwood Heights Road. They are open Wednesdays and Fridays from 6-8 in the evening and Saturdays from 11-4. Call ahead to make sure someone is there. Their phone number is 272-7809. I made a Bison Shepherd’s Pie from Bon Appetit which was incredibly good. I am posting my adapted version of the recipe for you to try.
 
 
If you want to buy local BEEF, CHICKEN,TURKEY,GOOSE, LAMB and PORK we have Autumn's Harvest Farm in Romulus. You can contact them directly or buy some of their products through Garden Gate Delivery which sells many local products and delivers them right to your home.  Their grocery items come mostly from processors and farmers located within 25 miles of Ithaca.  For the next two weeks Marlo, from Garden Gate is waiving the $8 delivery fee so this would be a good time to check out her extensive offerings.
 
McDonalds Farm and Sabols are long time favorites who sell many cuts of meat at the Farmers market and continue to deliver into town through the winter. You can pre-order from McDonalds Farm and Peter will meet you at his truck at the Farmer’s Market location at Steamship landing on Saturdays. Sabol's Farm has a similar arrangement. If you call ahead to order, he will meet you at the Greenstar parking lot through the winter. Richard's number is 607-869-5896. Sabols also sells through Garden Gate if you want your meat delivered to your doorstep.
 
High Point Farms is located in Trumansburg and raises grass fed beef, pork and lamb and free range chickens. They sell from their farm on Tuesdays and Fridays from 3-6 and Saturdays 11-2 . They also have ground beef available in the freezer section at Shur Save in T-Burg.
 
The Piggery is a new addition to the Farmers Market scene. The long lines waiting to buy fresh cuts of pork and homemade sausages and pates indicate that they have a loyal following. If you're looking for a particular cut of meat or some special charcuterie I would recommend you call ahead since they tend make small batches and run out quite quickly.
 
 
For more information about Dairy, eggs, poultry and meat farmers located in the Southern Tier and the Finger Lakes visit the Local Foods website of Cooperative Extension.
 
It is more expensive to buy local, pasture raised meats but there are several advantages. 
  • You’re supporting our local farmers who work hard to give us great quality
  • No middle-people are involved
  • You know what you’re getting. Just visit the farms to see for yourself.
  • It’s healthier. Grass fed meat have 2-4 times the levels of Omega 3 than in grain fed animals. And you aren’t consuming unknown chemicals, hormones, and antibiotics.
  • And for me, knowing that the animals are humanely treated is particularly important.
 
The Braised Pork Shoulder with Pomegranate and Quince recipe that I recently tried from Bon Appétit  was a great success .  I made a few changes to keep the ingredients  local and more affordable. Below are both recipes to enjoy on a cold winter’s night. Both should be made a day or two ahead of time and reheated for ultimate flavor.
 
 
Bison Shepherd's Pie: 8 SERVINGS
Adapted from Bon Appétit magazine September 2008
 
Ingredients
meat layer
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 2 pounds ground bison meat* or ground beef
  • 2 cups chopped onions
  • 8 oz mushrooms, finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
  • 2 cups low-salt chicken broth
  • 1 cup dry red wine
vegetable layer
  • 2 cups diced peeled carrots
potato topping
  • 2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
  • 1 large head of cauliflower (about 1 1/2 pounds), cored, coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, room temperature
  • 1/4 cup milk OR ½ &½  
  • 2 1/2 cups freshly grated Parmesan cheese, divided (about 8 ounces)
  • Extra-virgin olive oil for drizzling
  • Chopped fresh Italian parsley
  • Paprika
Preparation
meat layer
§         Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large pot over high heat. Add bison; sauté until browned, about 5 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer meat to bowl. Add 1 tablespoon oil to pot, then add onions and mushrooms. Sauté until soft, about 7 minutes. Add tomato paste; stir 2 minutes. Add thyme and flour and stir 1 minute. Add broth and wine and bring to boil. Return bison to pot. Reduce heat; simmer until mixture thickens and is reduced, about 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
vegetable layer
§         Cook carrots in boiling salted water just until slightly softened, about 2 minutes. Drain. Transfer to bowl. Set aside.
potato topping
§         Cook potatoes and cauliflower in large pot of boiling salted water until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain, reserving cooking liquid. Transfer potatoes and cauliflower to processor and puree, adding reserved cooking liquid, 1/4 cup at a time, until mixture is smooth. Transfer mixture to bowl; stir in butter and milk, then 2 cups Parmesan cheese. Season potato topping to taste with salt and pepper.
ASSEMBLY
Preheat oven to 400°F. Butter 15x10x2-inch glass baking dish. Spread meat mixture in dish. Top with carrots. Spread potato topping over, covering completely and swirling with knife to create peaks, if desired. Drizzle lightly with oil; sprinkle with 1/2 cup Parmesan. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 day ahead. Chill uncovered until cold, then cover and keep chilled. Let stand at room temperature 2 hours before continuing.
        Bake pie uncovered until heated through and top is lightly browned, 30- 50   minutes. Sprinkle with parsley and paprika.
 
 

 

Braised Pork Shoulder with Quince
Adapted from Bon Appétit recipe | October 2008
 
Yield: Makes 8 servings
 
 Ingredients:
2 teaspoons paprika
1 1/2 teaspoons coarse kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
Pinch of ground cinnamon
1 4-5 pound boneless pork shoulder (Boston butt), trimmed, tied in several places to hold shape if necessary

 

1 tablespoon olive oil
3 large quinces or apples (about 1 1/2 pounds total), peeled, cored, each cut into bite size chunks

2 cups chopped onions
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup finely chopped carrot
3 large garlic cloves, chopped
1 cup apple cider juice
1 cup low-salt chicken broth
2 tablespoons red currant jelly
2 small bay leaves
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
2 TBS Pomegranate molasses
 
 
 
Stir paprika, 1 1/2 teaspoons coarse kosher salt, 1 teaspoon black pepper, coriander, ginger, allspice, and cinnamon in small bowl to blend. Spread spice mixture all over pork shoulder. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate overnight.
 
Preheat oven to 325°F. Heat oil in heavy large oven-proof pot over medium-high heat. Add pork shoulder and brown on all sides, about 10 minutes. Transfer pork to plate. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons drippings from pot and reduce heat to medium. Add quince to pot. Sauté until cut sides are lightly browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer quince to bowl. Add onions, celery, and carrot to pot. Sauté until vegetables begin to soften, about 10 minutes. Add garlic; sauté1 minute. Add cider and chicken broth. Bring to boil, scraping up browned bits. Add red currant jelly, bay leaves, and thyme, then quince. Return pork to pot, fat side up. Cover pot with foil, then lid; place in oven.
 
Braise pork until very tender and thermometer inserted into center registers 165°F, basting occasionally, about 2 hours 15 minutes. Cool pork uncovered at room temperature. Chill uncovered until cold, then cover and chill at least 1 day and up to 3 days.
 
Preheat oven to 350°F. Transfer pork to work surface. Cut off string. Cut pork crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Overlap slices in 13x9x2-inch baking dish. Using slotted spoon, arrange vegetables and quince around pork. Boil juices in pot until thickened enough to coat spoon, about 15 minutes. Season to taste with coarse kosher salt,. Pour juices over pork. Cover and bake until heated through, about 30 -40 minutes.
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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